Reading Time: 2 minutes Palliative care is care that helps people live their life as fully and as comfortable as possible when living with a life-limiting or terminal illness. Palliative care identifies and treats symptoms which may be physical, Read more…" />
Reading Time: 2 minutes

Palliative care is care that helps people live their life as fully and as comfortable as possible when living with a life-limiting or terminal illness.

Palliative care identifies and treats symptoms which may be physical, emotional, spiritual or social. Because palliative care is based on individual needs, the services offered will differ but may include:

  • Relief of pain and other symptoms e.g. vomiting, shortness of breath
  • Resources such as equipment needed to aid care at home
  • Assistance for families to come together to talk about sensitive issues
  • Links to other services such as home help and financial support
  • Support for people to meet cultural obligations
  • Support for emotional, social and spiritual concerns
  • Counseling and grief support
  • Referrals to respite care services
  • Improves the quality of care
  • Focuses on the quality of life
  • May improve survival
  • Relieves burden on family
  • For further assistance in decision making
  • To coordinate care among multiple providers

This is a family-centered model of care, meaning that family and caregivers can receive practical and emotional support.

Who is palliative care for?

This  care is for everyone of any age who has been told that they have a serious illness cannot be cured. Palliative care assists people with illnesses such as cancer, motor neuron disease and end-stage kidney or lung disease to manage symptoms and improve quality of life.

For some people, palliative care may be beneficial from the time of diagnosis with a serious life-limiting illness. Palliative care can be given alongside treatments given by other doctors.

Who is in the palliative care team?

Patient care assistant, personal care aide, aged care worker and any other health care provider plays an important role in providing palliative care, as do family caregivers.  They are supported by specialist palliative care services if symptoms become difficult to manage.

Where is palliative care provided?

Palliative care is provided where the person and their family wants, where possible. This may include:

  • At home
  • In hospital
  • In a hospice
  • In a residential aged care facility

Many people indicate a preference to die at home and making this possible often depends on several factors, including:

  • the nature of the illness and amount of care the person needs
  • how much support is available from the person’s family and community
  • Whether the person has someone at home who can provide physical care and support for them.

How do I get palliative care?

For help and information ask your :

  • Doctor
  • Aboriginal Health Worker
  • Hospital Liaison Officer
  • HACC Worker
  • Nurse

Where can I find more information?

For more information contact info@tenderheartscareug.com

0788307598/ 0703468558

DO NOT LEAVE YOUR LOVED ONES UNATTENDED TO!

 

Was this post helpful?


Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Related Posts

blog

BROKE GIRL’S GUIDE TO SELF-CARE.

Reading Time: 1 minute We have all been there we need to pamper yourself but the current budget does  not support you to achieve all things you need. We have put together a guide to broke girls self care, Read more…

blog

Fathers! Here is One Guaranteed Way to Daddy Status

Reading Time: 2 minutes Lets admit it, anyone can be a father but it takes much more for one to be called daddy, at bear minimum to get the daddy status, you have to be present in both the Read more…

blog

What Does the Newborn Physical Examination Check For?

Reading Time: 3 minutes All parents are offered a thorough physical examination for their baby within 72 hours of giving birth.The examination includes screening tests to find out if your baby has any problems with their eyes, heart, hips Read more…

%d bloggers like this: